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Building on foundations laid by the first residents of Licking County, Newark Earthworks Day 2006 honors the Native American architects with the theme "Ancient Knowledge, Modern Mystery."

Saturday, October 14, The Ohio State University at Newark campus will host a variety of speakers and programs, free and open to the public, from a 9:00 am opening ceremony to the last talk at 4:00 pm. A Native American feast will follow which is the only portion of the day with an admission charge: adults are $10.00 and children under 12 $4.00.

While archaeologists and astronomers share what they have learned about the “modern mystery” of the earthwork’s alignments to the cycle of the moon that plays out over generations, Native American speakers will share their perspectives on the "ancient knowledge" encoded in the Newark Earthworks and how the earthworks relate to today’s Native American people.

Carol Welsh, director of the Native American Indian Center of Central Ohio (NAICCO) will speak on why the earthworks are believed to be sacred places by Native people, and NAICCO will present the feast Saturday evening. Bill Iseminger, a representative from Cahokia State Memorial in Illinois, will share the story of one of the other two North American sites listed in "Seventy Wonders of the Ancient World."

Robert Warrior, distinguished professor of English at the University of Oklahoma and graduate of New York City’s prestigious Union Theological Seminary, will look at Native American intellectual traditions and how different groups have competing claims on the importance and value of the earthwork

The Honorable Alfred Berryhill, Second Chief of the Creek Nation, The Mound, Okmulgee, Oklahoma as well as The Honorable Jay Hottinger, Ohio State Senator, District 31 will speak.

Returning from last year are Brad Lepper from the Ohio Historical Society, where he is curator of archaeology, and Ray Hively and Robert Horn of Earlham College, where they will share results from their ongoing research into the archaeoastronomy of the Licking River valleys surrounding the Newark Earthworks.

A number of children’s activities, crafts, and cultural activities are on the agenda; visitors are encouraged to join Newark Earthworks Day for all of their Saturday, but may easily enter and depart as their schedule permits during the different programs. Most of the day will center on the Reese Center and grounds, but weather related adjustments will be marked with signage and volunteers on the OSU-N campus.

For more information, call the Newark Earthworks Center of OSU-N at 740-364-9584.

PROGRAM

Program for Newark Earthworks Day, Oct. 14, 2006


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8:00  Open registration for processional @ Hopewell Hall Cafeteria

8:30  Line-up of processional begins

 

9:00  Welcome by Jeff Gill, Newark Earthworks Day Host

        Procession of Honored Guests from Hopewell Hall into the Auditorium       

9:10  Honored Guests Announced as Processional enters Reese Center

       

9:20  The Honorable Jay Hottinger, Ohio State Senator, District 31

9:25  "The Newark Earthworks: Ohio's Prehistoric Monument"

        The Newark Earthworks Committee of Wm. E. Miller Elementary, Newark City Schools.

 

9:45  The Honorable Jay Hottinger, Ohio State Senator, District 31

        "Taking a Stand for the Newark Earthworks:  Teaching, Learning and Changing     the State of Ohio Legislature in the Classroom"

        Kristine Cartwright, Garfield Elementary, Teacher In-Service

        Glenda Reynolds, Kirkersville Elementary, 2nd Grade Science

        Stori Delancy, Kirkersville Elementary, 2nd Grade Science

        Mat Dunham, Lincoln Middle School, Mounbuilders Club

 

10:30        Ms. Sande Garner (Cherokee), Research Associate, Newark Earthworks Center and the Department of Comparative Studies

10:35        "Multigenerational Trauma and the Healing Journey of a Dacotah Woman: Zitkana Ho Waste Wiyan,"

        Ms. Carol Welsh (Sisseton-Wahpeton), Director, Native American Indian Center Central Ohio

 

11:15        Dr. Jay Miller (Delaware), Coordinator of American Indiaen Studies

11:20        "Self Determination and Moundbuilding"

        The Honorable Alfred Berryhill, Second Chief of the Creek Nation, The Mound, Okmulgee, Oklahoma

 

12:00        Lunch Break - Please visit our vendors and exhibitors in the Ballroom        

 

        Please visit the following presentation in the Reese Center:

       

        "The Astronomy behind the Lunar Alignments at the Newark Earthworks" 

        Dr. Michael Mickelson, Physics and Astronomy Department, Denison University, 12pm – 1:00pm, Reese Center room 149

               

       

        Come donate your earthworks story to the Oral History Archive!

        Open 10am - 4pm.  Newark Earthworks Story Booth, Dr. Katey Borland, Associate Professor, Comparative Studies, OSUN, and Dr. Michael Sherfy, Assistant Profession, History, OSUN, Reese Center room 153.

       

1:00     Dr. Richard Shiels, Interim Director and Associate Professor of History, Newark Earthworks Center, OSU-Newark

1:05  "From Sunrise to Moonrise: Cahokia and Newark"

        Mr. William Iseminger, Assistant Site manager at Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site and World Heritage Site

 

2:00  Dr. Michael Mickelson, Physics and Astronomy Department, Denison University

        “Exploring Lunar Architecture in Newark

        Dr. Robert Horn, Professor of Philosophy, Earlham College

 

        "Geometry and Astronomy at the Newark Earthworks"

        Dr. Ray Hively, Professor of Physics, Earlham College

 

3:30  Chad Allen, Department of English, Ohio State University Columbus.

        "Sovereignty and History: Confessions of a Native Archaeologist"

        Dr. Robert Warrior (Osage), English and Native American Studies, University of Oklahoma

   

4:30  Dr. Richard Shiels, Interim Director, Newark Earthworks Center and Associate Professor of History

        "The Shaman of the Newark Earthworks"

        Dr. Bradley Lepper, Curator of Archaeology, Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, Ohio

    

5:30 Concluding Remarks and Closing

 

5:45 American Indian Feast

        Hosted by the Native American Indian Center of Columbus, Ohio

        Hopewell Hall, Ohio State University at Newark      

Tickets:  Adults:  $10, Children:  free


 

About the NED Participants:

 

The Procession:

        The Procession will open the events of Newark Earthworks Day at 9:00 am.  Led by a Drum and Native American Indian dancers, honored guests include Newark Earthworks Day speakers, participants in the Oral History Project, elected officials, and representatives of American Indian organizations.

                                           

Teacher Panel:

Kristine Cartwright, Garfield Elementary, Teacher In-Service

Glenda Reynolds, Kirkersville Elementary, 2nd Grade Science

Stori Delancy, Kirkersville Elementary, 2nd Grade Science

Mat Dunham, Lincoln Middle School, Mounbuilders Club

"Taking a Stand for the Newark Earthworks:  Teaching, Learning and Changing     the State of Ohio Legislature in the Classroom"

 

Alfred Berryhill, Second Chief of the Creek Nation, The Mound, Okmulgee, Oklahoma

"Self Determination and Moundbuilding"

        Alfred Berryhill, Second Chief of the Creek Nation, is a fluent speaker of his native language and a second generation Methodist preacher.  The Second Chief is the other half of the leadership pair often represented by twin figures in Mississippian Mound Builder Art.  His career has been concerned with issues of Native health, education, and wellbeing, and he has held leadership roles in both Washington DC and Oklahoma.  Yale University recently commended him for his efforts to preserve Creek hymns, which he has gathered together and arranged for Praise and Worship in today’s Creek churches.  He comes to OSUN as an elected official of a sovereign nation with an ancient and vital moundbuilding tradition. 

 

Jeff Gill, Newark Earthworks Day Host

        Jeff Gill is a writer and columnist seen in a number of publications around central Ohio and beyond.  He writes on history, community, faith and the environment.  A storyteller and ordained Christian minister, he is involved in a number of non-formal education programs with children and families across the region.  He lives in Granville, Oho, with his wife Joyce Meredith and their son, Chris.

 

Dr. Robert Horn, Professor of Philosophy, Earlham College

“Exploring Lunar Architecture in Newark”

 

Dr. Ray Hively, Professor of Physics, Earlham College

"Geometry and Astronomy at the Newark Earthworks"

 

 

 

William Iseminger, Assistant Site manager at Cahokia.

"From Sunrise to Moonrise: Cahokia and Newark"

        Mr. Iseminger will talk about Cahokia and the process he and others followed to achieve the international recognition that all three sites deserve.  Cahokia was a city of 20,000 in the year 1200. Today it is a World Heritage Site with a very fine interpretation center.  The Newark Earthworks are one of only three sites in the entire United States which are included among the Seventy Wonders of the Ancient World.  The other two are Chaco Canyon located in New Mexico, and Cahokia, in southern Illinois, directly across the Mississippi River from St. Louis.

        Mr. Iseminger is an archaeologist who has worked at Cahokia Mounds since 1971. He earned his BA in Anthropology from the University of Oklahoma, and his Masters in Anthropology from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.  He participated in excavations one summer in South Dakota, but most of his archaeological work has been in Illinois.  He conducted archaeological surveys where Kinkaid Lake is now located in southern Illinois, and along the lower Kaskaskia River, and he also dug at Dickson Mounds in central Illinois.

        The majority of his work has been at Cahokia Mounds, where he has led excavations and public field schools following the path of the Palisade or fortification wall, finding post locations for the Woodhenge sun calendar, and putting test trenches into Mound 1 and Mound 50.  He has also assisted several of his colleagues in other excavations in the area and at Cahokia Mounds.  For the past three years he has been co-director for an Earthwatch Institute excavation at Cahokia, tracing more of the route of the Palisade wall.

        He has written extensively on Cahokia Mounds for both professional and popular publications, including ARCHAEOLOGY magazine, and presented papers on his research at archaeological conferences. Currently, he serves as assistant site manager and public relations director at Cahokia Mounds State Historic Site in Collinsville, Illinois.

 

Dr. Bradley Lepper, Curator of Archaeology, Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, Ohio

"The Shaman of the Newark Earthworks."

        The Shaman of the Newark Earthworks, sometimes referred to as the "Wray figurine," is a small stone sculpture of a human figure wearing a bear mask and robe.  The sculpture was found beneath the largest and most centrally-located mound in the cluster of burial and ceremonial mounds at the Newark Earthworks.  In this presentation, the Shaman of Newark will be used as a prism through which to view aspects of the purpose and meaning of the Newark Earthworks.  The interpretation of this figurine will be based on all available archaeological data as well as ethnohistoric observations of individuals who appear to have served similar roles in Native American societies.

 

Dr. Michael Mickelson, Physics and Astronomy Department, Denison University

"The Astronomy behind the Lunar Alignments at the Newark Earthworks" 

        My plan is to talk about the astronomy involved in this phenomenon our ancestors regularly must have observed and in modern times have been less observed due to the effects of our modern environment...for example the bright outdoor lighting of the urban environment and the cultural environment that focuses our attention on things indoors at night.  I plan to explain - in as non-technical way as possible - why we see the moon behave as it does if we actually observe it in a critical and patient way.  I will discuss the environmental and cultural aspects which may have led ancient peoples to be cognizant of the motion of the moon and encode it in the fabric of their culture and into the landscape.

 

The Wm E. Miller Elementary Newark Earthworks Committee

"The Newark Earthworks: Ohio's Prehistoric Monument"

        The Committee consists of the 2005-06 fourth graders and teachers from Wm. E. Miller Elementary, Newark City Schools. The teachers are Linda Woolard, Debe Petrey, and Raymond Picton, the Fulbright Exchange Teacher from England. Mary Borgia from Miller is a Fulbright Teacher in England until January.

        Our presentation will share the significance of the Newark Earthworks and why we worked to honor these magnificent geometric earthworks. On June 7, 2006, Governor Taft signed Senate Bill 271 into law at the Octagon and Circle Earthworks making the Newark Earthworks Ohio's Prehistoric Monument, the first state prehistoric monument in the country.

 

Dr. Robert Warrior (Osage), English and Native American Studies,  University of Oklahoma

"Sovereignty and History: Confessions of a Native Archaeologist,"

        In the summers of 1984 and 1985, Robert Warrior worked as a volunteer for Israel's Department of Antiquities and Museums at the site of  biblical Capernaum, participating in excavations of the site and  traveling widely in Israel and Palestine in the days leading up to  the first Palestinian intifada. These experiences will form the basis of Professor Warrior's reflections on the connections between the  historical world illuminated by sites like the Newark Earthworks and  the contemporary lives of American Indian people who continue to seek  a just future.

 

Ms. Carol Welsh (Sisseton-Wahpeton), Director, Native American Indian Center Central Ohio

"Multigenerational Trauma and the Healing Journey of a Dacotah Woman: Zitkana Ho Waste Wiyan"

        A brief look at the everyday challenges of walking in two worlds, the impact of continuing cultural genocide and the significance of the ancestral connections found in the magnificent Newark Earthworks.

 


Copyrighted December 2005 by Michael E. Mickelson, taken 2005-Dec-16 at 18:12 EST 

 

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